H1N1

H1N1

H1N1

The 1918 flu pandemic (the H1N1 strain) that lasted between January 1918 and December 1920 infected 500 million people and killed up to 100 million. Unlike normal influenza, the 1918 strain generally affected healthy, younger people. This was due to their stronger immune systems overreacting. People would often contract pneumonia and die due to suffocation from their own secretions. It is interesting to note that the 1918 flu pandemic caused more deaths than the whole of World War One. It is thought to have originated at Camp Funston in Kansas, America in March 1918. Due to the infected troops living in close proximity to each other and because they travelled around the world, the deadly flu virus soon spread.

Fred Rowbottom

Fred Rowbottom

Fred Rowbottom - death certificate

Fred Rowbottom – death certificate

My great grandfather, Fred Rowbottom, died from the 1918 flu virus. Fred caught it and his doctor told him to stay in his house, but he decided that the pub might make him feel better. He went out on a very cold night, contracted pneumonia and subsequently died. I know that at least 4 other members of my family tree died from this deadly virus. Below are a couple of newspaper articles regarding two families in my tree that suffered. The first regards the death of my great great granduncle who was called William Henry Remmington and the second is regarding my first cousin, thrice removed (Bernard Vincent Early) and his family.

Remmington. W. H.

Remmington. W. H.

William H. Remmington

William H. Remmington

THE ADVERTISER. SATURDAY. JANUARY 11. 1919.

DEATH OF ONE OF THE ORIGINAL TERRITORIALS

A VICTIM TO INFLUENZA

Transport Driver W. Remington (1/5 York and Lancaster Reg.), son of Mr. and Mrs. Remington, of 9, The Crofts, Rotherham, who is reported to have died of pneumonia, following influenza, in France on December 20th last, was one of the original members of the 1/5 Batt. York and Lancaster Regt. (the local Territorials) which left England in April, 1915. He was 23 years of age, and joined the Army on the outbreak of the war. At the time of his illness he was on the point of being demobilised in order to return to work at the Silverwood Colliery.

THE ADVERTISER. SATURDAY. MARCH 8. 1919.

Early grave

Early grave

EARLY. – Bernard Vincent Early, aged 30, died at 6, Lister Street, on Thursday, Feb. 27, from influenza. Elizabeth Early, aged 31, wife of the above, who died on Friday, Feb 28. Cyril Early, aged 11 months, infant son of the above, died March 5.

The relatives of the above beg to thank the workmen of Messrs. Steel, Peech and Tozer Ltd. for their practical sympathy, the bearers who volunteered to carry the little family to the grave, and all friends for their expressions of grief in this sad event.

Frank Jarvis Pinder

Frank J. Pinder

Frank J. Pinder

Frank Jarvis Pinder is my first cousin, thrice removed. Below is a newspaper article(s) published shortly after his death.

THE ADVERTISER, SAT., JAN. 19TH, 1963

OBITUARY

MR. F. J. PINDER

Mr. Frank Jarvis Pinder, of 33, Fitzwilliam Road, Rotherham, died on Tuesday at the home of his grand-daughter. He was 85.

Born in Masbro’ Street, Mr. Jarvis had lived in the Rotherham area all his life. He was employed as a brass finisher at Gummer’s Ltd., for more than 50 years, and retired when he was 82. Previously, he had worked in a similar capacity at Stone’s and Gumby’s, of Rotherham.

Mr. Pinder was a keen gardener, and was a former secretary of the St. Ann’s Gardens and Allotments Society. During World War I he served as secretary to the Rotherham Hospitals Potato Scheme. Singing was another of his interests.

Saint Stephen's Church, Eastwood, Rotherham

Saint Stephen’s Church, Eastwood, Rotherham

He attended the St. Stephen’s Church, Eastwood, where he was a member of the Parochial Church Council, and had been a sidesman.

He leaves two sons, and a grand-daughter. His wife died more than 10 years ago. Cremation takes place to-day, at Rotherham after a service at St. Stephen’s Church, Eastwood.

PINDER. – Suddenly, on January 15th, at his grand-daughter’s residence, 21, Vernon Road. Frank Jarvis, aged 85 years, of 33, Fitzwilliam Road, a dear father and grandad. Service at St. Stephen’s Church, to-day (Saturday), 11 a.m., cremation, Herringthorpe, 11.30 a.m.

New houses for Maltby

Herbert Mollekin

Herbert Mollekin

My great uncle, Herbert Mollekin, was a prolific house/estate builder and below is a newspaper article regarding the completion of a new batch of houses in Maltby.

THE ADVERTISER, SATURDAY, OCTOBER 9, 1926

NEW HOUSES FOR MALTBY.

ALD. E. DUNN CONGRATULATES CONTRACTOR ON FINE WORK.

WHEN HOUSES COST £135.

At a cost of £17,781 17s., thirty-six houses have been built by the Maltby Urban District Council, and they were officially handed over to the Council on Wednesday by Mr. H. Mollekin, the contractor.

The Council have now completed 112 houses, 76 of which were commenced some years ago by the Rotherham Rural District Council, but which were completed by the Maltby Urban District Council. Twelve of the 36 new houses, which are built on either side of a new road called Rolleston Avenue, are of the “non-parlour” type. The architect was Mr. Morgan R. Jones, engineer and surveyor to the Maltby U.D.C. The keys of the houses will be handed over to the tenants on Monday.

After an inspection of the houses on Wednesday by members of the Council, headed by County Alderman E. Dunn, Councillor H. Shaw (vice-chairman of the Maltby U.D.C.), and Councillor H. Ross (chairman of the Housing Committee), a luncheon was provided by Mr. H. Mollekin at the Queen’s Hotel, Maltby.

Proposing the health of Mr. Mollekin, Ald. Dunn thanked him for providing the luncheon, and congratulated him on the erection of the very fine houses they had just inspected. He was sure that no member of the Council who had just inspected the houses could have any ground for complaint. He (Ald. Dunn) had seen many housing sites, and he thought he could claim to be a pioneer with regard to Maltby housing. He thought that the severing of Maltby from the Rotherham Rural District Council had been amply justified. He hoped that the tenants who were going to occupy the houses would be house proud and would take advantage of the land at the rear or the houses. He saw no reason why this housing site should not become one of the most picturesque of its kind in the country.

Mr. Mollekin had been responsible for the building of about 1500 houses in Maltby, and the miners in the district were very grateful to him for the splendid houses he had erected for them.

The vice-chairman of the Council (Mr. H. Shaw) endorsed all Ald. Dunn had said. The Maltby Council, he thought could fairly claim to have set a good example to many other local authorities.

Mr. Mollekin, replying, said he had been living in Maltby for 21 years. He recalled the time when big houses were built and sold for £135, and the contractor had to make the roads as well. Nowadays, the bricks alone cost that amount.

Speaking of the relations which should be maintained between employer and employee, Mr. Mollekin said, “If there is any distinction between employer and employee, we shall never get on well with labour in this country.”

He refused to believe that the British workman had altered since the Great War.

Pinder – Turnbull Marriage

George A. Turnbull and Marjory Pinder

George A. Turnbull and Marjory Pinder

Marjory Pinder is my great aunt and she married George Alaister Turnbull.  Below is a newspaper article(s) which describes this occasion.

THE ADVERTISER, SATURDAY, AUGUST 18, 1934.

AN EASTWOOD WEDDING.

SCHOLASTIC BRIDE AND BRIDEGROOM.

TURNBULL-PINDER.

The marriage took place in the Eastwood Methodist Church on Thursday of Miss Marjory Pinder, M.A., the younger daughter of Mrs. Pinder, of East Dene, Rotherham, and the late Mr. M. H. Pinder, to Mr. G. A. Turnbull, B.Sc., the only son of Mr. And Mrs. W. Turnbull, of Newcastle-on-Tyne.

The marriage service was conducted by the Rev. G. W. Thorn (Circuit Superintendent Minister), and the organist was Mr. Harold Rooks.

The bride, who was educated at the Rotherham High School and took her degree at the Sheffield University, has since been French and music mistress at the Shiremoor Modern School. The bridegroom, who was educated at Rutherford College, Newcastle-on-Tyne, took his degree at the Durham University and is mathematics master at Bedlington Secondary School.

The bride was attired in a charming ivory satin gown, combined with wreath and veil, and carried a bouquet of cream roses. The chief attendant, Mrs. Sidney Addy, was dressed in green floral georgette and carried a bouquet of lemon carnations. The two junior attendants (nieces of the bride) were dressed in primrose georgette and carried Victorian posies of marigolds.

A reception was held in the Methodist Church Schoolroom, Eastwood.

Eastwood Methodist Church and Schoolroom

Eastwood Methodist Church and Schoolroom

The honeymoon is being spent in North Wales, and the newly-married couple will take up their residence in Morpeth, Northumberland.

The father of the bride was for many years Water Department Superintendent for the Rotherham Corporation.

TURNBULL – PINDER. – At the Eastwood Methodist Church on Thursday, August 16th, by the Rev. G. W. Thorn. George, the only son of Mr. And Mrs. W. Turnbull, of Newcastle-on-Tyne, to Marjory, younger daughter of Mrs. Pinder, of East Dene, Rotherham.

Leonard George Briggs

Leonard George Briggs is my fourth cousin.  Below is a newspaper article(s) published shortly after his death.

THE SOUTH YORKSHIRE AND ROTHERHAM ADVERTISER, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 17TH, 1966

GIFT FOR YOUTH PROJECT INSTEAD OF A WREATH

Neighbours of a 19-years old Rotherham youth, who died of cancer on Monday have started a collection for a project at the Dalton Parish Church Youth Club, an organisation which the youth, Leonard George Briggs, of 143, Herringthorpe Valley Road, East Herringthorpe, Rotherham, always supported.

The collection, which will probably be used to help to purchase a Land Rover for the youth club, was first intended to buy flowers for Leonard’s funeral yesterday, but his mother, Mrs. Phyllis Briggs, decided that the money would be far better spent buying something of lasting use to the youth club.

Mrs. Briggs told “The Advertiser” this week: “When the collection was first started among the neighbours, it was intended to buy a wreath for Leonard’s funeral, but after having a word with the Rev. Peter Challen, we decided that the money would be of far more use if it was put towards some youth project. As my son took a great deal of interest in the Dalton Parish Youth Club, it was thought that this would be the best place for the money”

Leonard, who died at his home, had been an Able Seaman with the Royal Navy, and developed cancer while abroad. In January of this year, he was discharged from the Royal Navy Hospital, Portsmouth, where he had been receiving treatment, and was admitted to the Rotherham Hospital, Doncaster Gate. In February, he was allowed home, but after a short time was taken to the Sheffield Royal Infirmary.

VERY HAPPY

After two weeks, Leonard was once again allowed home, where he spent most of his time practising for the driving test which he had hoped to take next year: “We never told him the nature of his illness as we did not want to worry him unduly. In fact, right to the end he was very happy and had even made plans for a camping holiday in Scotland next year”.

Leonard received an honourable discharge from the Navy in September, along with a report of his excellent character and the Borneo Star for fighting in Vietnam and Singapore.

He was educated at the High Greave Primary School and Spurley Hey Secondary School. He was also a member of the Eastwood View Working Men’s Club. He leaves his mother, father, two brothers and two sisters.

Cremation took place at Rotherham yesterday, following a service at the Dalton Parish Church, conducted by the Rev. P. Challen.

BRIGGS. – Leonard George, aged 19 years: ex-Royal Navy, eldest son of George and Phyllis Briggs (nee Brunt), and beloved brother of Lynn, Gerald, Carol and David; passed peacefully away after much suffering, December 12th.

Reunited with Grandma and Aunty Dot.

Beautiful memories woven in gold. This is the memory we tenderly hold.

BRIGGS. – Leonard, aged 19 years, passed peacefully away after much suffering, December 12th at home, 134, Valley Road. Beloved nephew of Margaret and Lol, and a beloved grandson of George and the late Dolly.

BRIGGS. – Leonard George, beloved nephew of Nora and George, dear cousin of Steven and Philip.

BRIGGS. – Leonard George.

Never to be forgotten.

Grandad and Grandma Brunt.

Three Generations of Pinder

Thomas Pinder, Francis Pinder & Matthew H. Pinder

Thomas Pinder, Francis Pinder & Matthew H. Pinder

Below are three obituaries pertaining to three generations of the Pinder family that feature in my family tree. The first is for Thomas Pinder (my third great grandfather), the second is for Francis Pinder (my second great grandfather) and the third is for Matthew Henry Pinder (my great grandfather).

ROTHERHAM AND MASBRO’ ADVERTISER, SATURDAY, MARCH 30, 1878

PINDER – March 23, Mr. Thomas Pinder, Hope Street, Masbro’, aged 71 years

THE ADVERTISER, SATURDAY, 10TH, 1935.

DEATH OF FORMER ROTHERHAM CHOIRMASTER.

The death occurred on Tuesday morning, at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Charles of Mr. Francis Pinder.

Mr. Pinder, who was for 66 years a respected employee of Messrs Yates, Haywood and Co., retiring about 13 years ago, was 89 years of age. Until a few years ago he was well known in local musical circles, having been choirmaster at Rotherham Congregational and Talbot Lane Methodist Churches. He was also a reputed organist and music master.

Mr. Pinder had been an invalid for about six years,

The interment took place in Moorgate Cemetery on Thursday morning, the Rev. Victor Watson conducting the service.

THE ADVERTISER, SATURDAY, AUGUST 26, 1922

PINDER. – On August 21, 1922, 1922, at 84 Bethel road, Matthew Henry, beloved husband of Alice Pinder, aged 52 years.

Joseph Street, Moorgate Road & Bethel Road

Joseph Street, Moorgate Road & Bethel Road

George Herbert Mollekin

George H. Mollekin

George H. Mollekin

George Herbert Mollekin is my first cousin, twice removed.  Below is a newspaper article(s) published shortly after his death.

THE ADVERTISER, FRI., MAR. 6TH, 1970

DEATH OF MR. G. H. MOLLEKIN

The death occurred recently at his home, of Mr. George Herbert Mollekin, of 16, Harvest Road, Wickersley. He was 80, and a former building contractor.

For most of his working life, Mr. Mollekin was associated with the Maltby firm of C. Mollekin Ltd. He began work at the firm with his father, and after his death, Mr. Mollekin and his brother, Mr. E. Mollekin, took control of the business for a number of years.

Mr. Mollekin spent most of his life in Maltby and had lived in Wickersley for about three years. During his younger days he was a keen sportsman.

He leaves a widow. Cremation took place last Saturday at Rotherham following a service conducted by Cannon W. Sorby Briggs.

MOLLEKIN. – On February 25th, George Herbert, the beloved husband of Dulcie Mollekin, passed away at his home, 16, Harvest Road, Wickersley. Service and cremation was at Rotherham Crematorium, Saturday, February 28th.

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